Upgrade AM4, or replace with AM5?

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Dirk Broer
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#1 Upgrade AM4, or replace with AM5?

Post by Dirk Broer »

Everyone has his/her own user case to consider (gaming, crunching, economics, bling-bling, etc.), but here is some food for thought regarding the AM4 vs the AM5 platform:
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If you look in the money/threads column you see that the AM4 platform still has its advantages, but that is the one-time purchase moment.
The everyday economics might be better served with the AM5 Ryzen 9 7900 though, though the AM4 Ryzen 9 5950X is a good contender too.

When you need that big L3 cache and economics play a part too, you'd best buy a AM4 Ryzen 7 5700X3D -and search for articles to clock it down so it consumes a mere 65 Watt. And, when money is the least of your worries: you'd better buy a brand-new 64 core Threadripper.
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#2 Re: Upgrade AM4, or replace with AM5?

Post by Megacruncher »

I'm not too short of dosh but I'd hesitate before splashing out on a current generation Threadripper 64 core system. £6302 on Scan just for a bundle. Yikes!

As it is I just bought a AM5 Ryzen 9 7950X bundle on Scan for a relatively modest £1300. I'm very happy with it.

I hadn't realised that it had on-chip graphics which seem to make a useful job of crunching E@H alongside my NVidia GPU.
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Dirk Broer
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#3 Re: Upgrade AM4, or replace with AM5?

Post by Dirk Broer »

The cheapest 64-core sTR5 socket Threadripper is -here- the Threadripper 7980X (Boxed) at € 5.322,89.
The most expensive 64-core sTR5 socket Threadripper is -over here again- the Threadripper Pro 7985WX (Tray) at € 8.147,56.

Cost-wise they are cheap as compared to the 96-core sTR5 socket Threadripper Pro 7995WX (Boxed) at € 11.149,00 -for just the CPU.

64 cores means 128 threads which, using my 4GB-per-thread rule-of-thumb, means 512 GB of DDR5 RAM.
96 cores means 192 threads which, using my 4GB-per-thread rule-of-thumb, means 768 GB of DDR5 RAM.

...and some of the sTR5 socket motherboards only have four RAM slots! Eight-slot mobo's are more than 1000 Euro's (ASRock WRX90 WS EVO at 1320 Euro's and ASUS PRO WS WRX90E-SAGE SE at 1202,28 Euro's)....

Very big modules are only for sale at very slow speeds (2666 MT/s), too :doh:

So, yes: viva the Ryzen 9 7950X and Ryzen 9 7950X3D! The latter has not only an on-chip RDNA2GPU, but for a bit of extra cash you also get extra cache :lol: :dance:
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#4 Re: Upgrade AM4, or replace with AM5?

Post by Dirk Broer »

In the end I bought two AM4 boards and one AM5 board.

The AM4 boards (an Asrock A320 HDV for the A12-9800E and an Asrock X470 iTX for the 2400G) are there for the CPUs that were pushed out of their mobo's in favour of better CPUs/APUs. Got them dirt-cheap from a company (Dealstunter) selling left-overs and refurbished equipment -my earlier X370 iTX is also from them. This gave rise for a need of new cases, mainly in the iTX department.
So, I also managed to get hold of a 2nd hand white version of the Fractal Design Node 304 for the X370 iTX based 3400G that got as comment from the wife upon seeing it "have you bought a new microwave?".
You can see in the link how easy it is to mix up the two!

I am now saving for a 2nd Node 304, in black, as they fit so snuggly in my computer rack -being just 210mm high. They also have room for a decent sized (165 mm high) cooler, plus two 92mm intake fans and a 140mm exhaust fan. The ideal iTX crunching-case after the Cooler Master 315F went out of production, IMHO. The A320 HDV with the A12-9800E will re-use an old Packard-Bell casing that used to be the PC-case of my late father and that once held an AMD Sempron as the casing sticker still proclaims.

The AM5 board then.
Just as with the introduction of the AM4 platform, when I went for an APU with the board that gave all I needed -the ASRock A320M Pro4- in terms of upgradability and APU support, I have now gone for an ASRock A620M Pro RS.
And this with the Ryzen 7 8700G, that not only has a decent GPU but a 16 TOPS NPU as well. Now I am hunting for a Fractal Design Node 804 to give it a home.

My next AM5 board will be a full-size ATX ASRock B650 Pro RS, again with a Ryzen 7 8700G to see any performance differences.

In the meantime I am building a new AM5 system for my son too, using a ASRock B650E PG Riptide WiFi with a Ryzen 5 7600 as CPU.
He wants to be prepared for PCIe 5.0 x16 GPUs and really full-speed NVMe PCIe 5.0 M.2 drives and does not want to change his mobo every five years -he comes from an Intel Socket 1155 system that I built for him ages ago.
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